Amanda Burton

 
Profession : Actress
Nationality : Irish
Birth : 10th October, 1956
Death :
About : Amanda Burton was born in Derry, Northern Ireland. She is a Northern Irish actress, active from 1981. During her career, Burton was best known for her television roles as Heather Black in the Channel 4 soap opera Brookside, Beth Glover in Peak Practice, Sam Ryan in the BBC crime drama series Silent Witness, Clare Blake in The Commander and Karen Fisher in Waterloo Road. After attending Londonderry High School, a girls only secondary school in the city of Derry, she moved to England at the age of 18, where she spent three years studying drama at the Manchester Metropolitan School of Theatre. Whilst there she met theatre technician Jonathan Hartley, whom she married when she was 20. Although best known for her television roles, Burton had worked almost exclusively in the theatre prior to landing the role of Heather Black in Channel 4's Liverpool-based flagship drama series Brookside. She played the role of Doctor Beth Glover in the medical drama series, based in Derbyshire's Peak District, for three series until her departure in 1995. In 1996 she then took the main role of Professor Sam Ryan in the highly acclaimed BBC drama Silent Witness, she held this role until 2004.

Amanda Burton Quotes

Being an actor is an extension of telling a story and I loved story telling as a child.
But I didn’t really enjoy my secondary education that much, probably because I am a very physical person and don’t enjoy sitting at a desk all day. I just dragged myself through GCSE and A Levels, so it suited me very much to go on to drama school, which was very active.
Forgotten was presented to me by the drama department at LWT as a concept and I found it immediately intriguing and very powerful. I was completely led by the power of the piece and its dramatic potential.
I always start from scratch with a character – they’re never based on anyone else.
I always start from scratch with a character – they’re never based on anyone else. You get ideas of what people look like, and I’m a great people watcher. You can draw inspiration from people.
I could suddenly see the pressures all around; these endless magazines and cheap reality TV programmes poking at women, humiliating us for every flaw.
I could suddenly see the pressures all around; these endless magazines and cheap reality TV programmes poking at women, humiliating us for every flaw. It makes me so angry. I really wonder what it is we are doing to ourselves, because I do think women can be the worst ones for picking each other apart.
I couldn’t imagine a home without animals.
I have been acting for 32 years now and I feel so lucky to be able to have done exactly what I wanted to do.
I have nothing against people having work done, it is when I hear tale of girls of 16 queuing up to get bigger breasts, that is when I despair.
I have sleepless nights before press days.
I like to think I’m a listener, and I’m fascinated by observing people – I suppose you just lock that in.
I still love coming into work everyday after so many years working as an actress. I’ve been working more or less continuously and I find I have to really want to do the project to make it work because you have to put such an enormous amount of effort into it.
I think some people think that being on television makes you a sitting duck, but you have the right to remain private.
I think you know what you’re up against when you take on a piece that you know is going to involve dragging up a lot emotions – you can end up being deeply immersed in gloom.
I was a complete tomboy. I loved wandering out in storms or walking on the beaches in the dark. It was a very free upbringing, and I’m grateful to my parents for that.
I was on holiday recently and I came home to find that one of the papers here had ‘bikini’d’ me on the beach. I was wearing a grossly unflattering costume and they had published photographs of me taken from behind. I looked dreadful. I went into our local newsagent and bought up every copy.
I was taught by my father. He was head of the primary school so I went to his school until I was 11 – I was the youngest of four daughters and we had all been taught by him.
I was taught by my father. He was head of the primary school so I went to his school until I was 11 – I was the youngest of four daughters and we had all been taught by him. But I didn’t really enjoy my secondary education that much, probably because I am a very physical person and don’t enjoy sitting at a desk all day.
I would never have changed anything in the past. I have been acting for 32 years now and I feel so lucky to be able to have done exactly what I wanted to do.
I’d been gearing up to working in theatre since coming out of drama school, but it was an exciting time for TV drama – it was the birth of Channel 4, and Brookside was very cutting-edge at the time.
I’m becoming more squeamish. I didn’t use to be – nine years of ‘Silent Witness’ prepared me for most things one will have the misfortune to see in life. Before, I’d be wading up to my neck in gore, but now I tend to look away.
If I want to run around a field when I’m 70, I would like to have that option.
It always interests me how obsessed people are about age.
No, I always wanted to be an actress.
Running gave me a focus to start looking after myself, to eat properly, and focus on building up my strength.
What a stupid attitude we have in this country to personal stories.
Whatever I’m doing, I try to give it everything.

Quote Of the Day

Anger and hatred lead to fear; compassion and concern for others allow us to develop self-confidence, which breeds trust and friendship.

Dalai Lama